Children

At Anatomy Physiotherapy, we believe that no child or young person should suffer unnecessarily because of a wetting or soiling problem.

Children’s Continence Physiotherapy

Ee recommend that all children over 5 with symptoms should be assessed by a health professional with specialised training in children’s continence.

At Anatomy Physiotherapy, we strive to improve the quality of life for children, young people and their families who suffer from the consequences of wetting and soiling difficulties, to help them manage or overcome these problems. We believe that no child or young person should suffer unnecessarily because of a wetting or soiling problem. It is important for children and families that suffer from these issues that they are able to receive the support, understanding, information and treatment they need.

 

Most children gain bladder and bowel control by age 4 or 5 and over time, bladder and bowel problems can often correct themselves. However, research has shown that this distressing condition can have far reaching effects on the emotional well-being and social development of children. It can prevent children and adolescents from fitting in, for example by stopping them having sleep overs and attending school trips. Therefore, we recommend that all children over 5 with symptoms should be assessed by a health professional with specialised training in children’s continence.

 

As part of Suzanne’s experience working with this category of patients in Australia and Ireland and through her Masters training, she has gained lots of clinical expertise in this area. All children’s continence initial appointments are one hour long, individualised and non-invasive. However, Suzanne’s skills with the real-time ultrasound allow her to get a clear clinical picture of the child’s bladder, bowel and pelvic floor function.

 

The emphasis is on quality and sensitive care of children and families.

Key Conditions

Appropriate conditions include:

  • Constipation / faecal retention
  • Faecal incontinence (previously called encopresis) or soiling
  • Failure to toilet train for either bowel or bladder
  • Day wetting (over 5 years old) urinary urgency, recurrent urinary tract infections
  • Bed wetting (over 6 years old) – primary or secondary, refractory to treatment
  • Children with both developmental and continence problems
  • Frequency during the day
  • Soiling underwear
Interventions

Depending on the assessment, interventions may include:

  • Education of parents and child
  • Toileting programs
  • Bladder/Bowel diary
  • Urine testing
  • Teaching correct defaecation muscle dynamics
  • Pelvic floor muscle training/relaxation
  • Bio feedback
  • Bedwetting alarm programmes
  • Neuromodulation (TENS, Interferential)
  • Liaison with pre-schools and schools
  • Working with medical or other specialist and services